MEDIA ALERT

EMBARGOED: 7.30AM AEST, SUNDAY, 29 AUGUST, 2021

                                                                                                                 

New treatment for adults with schizophrenia set to be PBS listed

Next Wednesday, 1 September, 2021 adults living with schizophrenia will gain affordable access to a new treatment option on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS).1

Affecting approximately 90,000 Australians,2 schizophrenia is considered our nation’s most disabling, and heavily stigmatised mental illness,3 with the average life expectancy of those with the illness, 12.5 to 16.5 years below that of the general population.2 The very high death rates associated with schizophrenia4 are often due to preventable physical diseases, such as heart disease diabetes, infections, and suicide.5,6

Given the complex range of symptoms, from hallucinations and delusions,7,8 to apathy and social withdrawal,9,10  treatment for schizophrenia is not a “one size fits all”.11

To learn more, including information about the availability and accessibility of affordable treatment options for adults living with schizophrenia, tee up an interview with a spokesperson below.

EXPERTS 

Prof Ian Hickie AM

 


 

Prof Suresh Sundram 

 

Dr Jonathan Anderson

A/Prof Dennis Liu


 

Dr Mathew Samuel

 

Co-Director for Health & Policy, Brain & Mind Centre, The University of Sydney &

NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellow, SYDNEY [currently on NSW Central Coast]

Head, Department of Psychiatry, School of Clinical Sciences, Monash University & Director of Research, Mental Health Program, Monash Health, MELBOURNE

Head of Medical Affairs Asia Pacific, Seqirus, MELBOURNE

Senior Consultant Psychiatrist, Northern Mental Health Service, Lyell McEwin Hospital & Clinical A/Prof, School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, ADELAIDE

Consultant Psychiatrist, Hollywood Medical Centre, PERTH

ADVOCACY GROUP REPRESENTATIVE
 

Tony Stevenson​

National Chief Executive Officer, Mental Illness Fellowship of Australia (MIFA), BRISBANE

AUSTRALIANS LIVING WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

Richard, 40

Mental health advocate & policy advisor living with schizophrenia, SYDNEY

Alana, 34

Author, podcaster & financial services Senior Product Development Manager
living with schizophrenia,
SYDNEY

J.J, 38

Mental health support peer group volunteer & mature aged student living with schizophrenia, SYDNEY

VNR

Available for download Sunday, 29 August, 2021 : https://vimeo.com/592544606/d1188a8813 

MEDIA CONTACT & INTERVIEWS

Joanne Cleary

Senior Manager, Communications, Seqirus

M         0428 816 751     

E          joanne.cleary@seqirus.com

 

 

Kirsten Bruce

Principal, VIVA! Communications

M         0401 717 566

E          kirstenbruce@vivacommunications.com.au

Mel Kheradi

Senior Account Manager, VIVA! Communications

M        0421 551 257     

E         mel@vivacommunications.com.au

About Seqirus

Seqirus, a CSL company, is a leading provider of essential vaccines and pharmaceuticals. We have served Australia’s healthcare needs for over a century, and today we operate Australia’s only local manufacturing facility for seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine. Seqirus produces a range of unique medicines in the National Interest, and also in-licences a broad range of paediatric and adult vaccines and specialty pharmaceutical products. http://www.seqirus.com/.

References ​

  1. The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme Medicine Status Website. CARIPRAZINE. 2021 [cited August, 2021]; Available from: https://www.pbs.gov.au/medicinestatus/document/16.html.

  2. The Royal Australian & New Zealand College of Psychiatrists, The economic cost of serious mental illness and comorbidities in Australia and New Zealand. 2016.

  3. Australian Government Productivity Commission, Mental Health, Productivity Commission Inquiry Report. 2020.

  4. Laursen, T.M., M. Nordentoft, and P.B. Mortensen, Excess early mortality in schizophrenia. Annu Rev Clin Psychol, 2014. 10: p. 425-48.

  5. Wildgust, H.J., R. Hodgson, and M. Beary, The paradox of premature mortality in schizophrenia: new research questions. J Psychopharmacol, 2010. 24(4 Suppl): p. 9-15.

  6. World Health Organization (WHO). Schizophrenia. 2019 [June 2021]; Available from: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/schizophrenia.

  7. Schultz, S.H., S.W. North, and C.G. Shields, Schizophrenia: a review. Am Fam Physician, 2007. 75(12): p. 1821-9.

  8. NeuRA. Positive symptoms. 2020  [June 2021]; Available from: https://library.neura.edu.au/schizophrenia/signs-and-symptoms/general-signs-and-symptoms/positive-symptoms/.

  9. National Institute of Mental Health. Schizophrenia. 2020 [June 2021]; Available from: https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/schizophrenia/.

  10. NeuRA. Negative symptoms. 2020  [July 2021]; Available from: https://library.neura.edu.au/schizophrenia/signs-and-symptoms/general-signs-and-symptoms/negative-symptoms/.

  11. Health Direct. Schizophrenia. 2020 [June 2021]; Available from: https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/schizophrenia.

Seqirus™ (Australia) Pty Ltd. ABN 66 120 398 067. Melbourne, Victoria; distributor for Gedeon Richter Australia Pty Ltd. www.seqirus.com.au. Seqirus Medical Information: 1800 642 865. SeqirusTM is a trademark of Seqirus UK limited or its affiliates. Date of Preparation: August 2021. ANZ-RGLA-21-0137